Category Archives: project

MELT, MOSS and CASCADE

By Dienke Dekker & KINNASAND

See also:
www.kinnasand.com

MELT 
With a complex melange of 5 different colours and yarns, the hand-woven rug MELT offers a delicate yet vibrant interplay of nuances. As you get closer to the rug, fine details teasingly emerge from its surface.

MELT - Kinnasand MELT colours - Picture by Dienke Dekker
MELT - Picture by Dienke DekkerWork in progress MELTSampling for MELT - Photos by Dienke Dekker

MOSS
MOSS combines the comfort of a hand-knotted rug with the pure aesthetic of a flatweave. It gains its exceptional volume from a specially developed technique, which involves looping a felted yarn around a filling yarn.

MOSS - Kinnasand MOSS colours - Picture by Dienke Dekker

CASCADE
The Persian hand-knotted rug CASCADE occupies a space between pattern and structure, and offers extraordinary colour depth. This property comes from combining materials that express hues in subtly different ways – wool, silk and linen – as well as a washed finish and a rich pile.

CASCADE - Kinnasand CASCADE COLOURS - Picture by Dienke DekkerCASCADE yarns - Picture by Dienke Dekker

WAAN for GAN-RUGS

by Dienke Dekker and GAN

Illusion. The knots become weaves and the grids, colours … or perhaps the other way around? The imagination and ingenuity convert these graphic structures into carpets …or vice versa? Mirage.

www.gan-rugs.com

Dienke Dekker for GAN - Waan
Dienke Dekker - working process 2, picture by Roos van LeeuwenDienke Dekker - working process 3, picture by Roos van Leeuwen
Dienke Dekker - working process 1, picture by Roos van Leeuwen

photos by GAN-RUGS and Roos van Leeuwen
2016

INTERSECT

by Dienke Dekker

“Intersect” is a series of studies in three-dimensional, sculptural weaving. Its sculptures emerged intuitively by applying and combining different weaving techniques. Interacting with a multitude of colours and patterns, abstracted forms are created onto which spectators are invited to project meaning.

Each sculpture started out as a sheet of 1-meter-long heavy paper, both sides of which are painted in different ways and rhythms with gouache, acrylic paint, acrylic marker, arcier or ballpen. The sheets were then cut into strips of one meter of varying width and used as yarns for the woven sculptures.

This project is based on “Union of striped yarns”, a project in which Dienke created a variety of flat-woven pieces using striped yarns. Fascinated by the intriguing patterns which appear by using only striped yarn, she decided to investigate the patterns of “yarns” in hexagonal and 3-dimensional weaves. As a result, the new study – “Intersect” – has a stronger focus on the interaction of colour, patterns and weaving techniques.

See more pictures here

Dienke_Dekker - LEGAN 1 - picture by Henri Verhoef Legan
The combination of a looser basket weave in the bottom and centre and a denser flat weave toward the top seems to make Legan levitate. The reduced use of colour – a block pattern on one side of the yarns and a gradient on the other – emphasises those differences in density.

Dienke_Dekker - PATSULA - picture by Henri Verhoef
Patsula
At one point, Patsula’s underlying flat weave gains a third dimension. Whereas before the leftover yarns have been folded by 90 degrees back into one another, they are suddenly left to end at free will, creating a hollow shape.

Dienke_Dekker - TOMET - picture by Henri Verhoef
Tomet
By folding the horizontal yarns to the front and securing them with vertical yarns in a 90-degree angle, a flat weave can take three-dimensional shapes. Tomet features various such ornaments. If you inspect it more closely, you will also find that the lines on Tomet’s yarns come together in various places to create squares with unique patterns.

Dienke_Dekker - TANMA - picture by Henri Verhoef
Tanma
Tanma gains a natural dynamic through its curling borders. This effect is created by weaving curved yarns into the fringes of a flat hexagonal weave. One of Tanma’s sides is marked by a multitude of colours and striped patterns, the other by fewer, but starker colour contrasts.

Dienke_Dekker - DERIG, LANNERT, LYLEJ - picture by Henri VerhoefDerig
Unlike many of the other Intersects, Derig’s shape is determined more by the stripes of the yarn than the weaving technique: The folds follow the encounters of identical colours in the flat weave. Depending on the position of the spectator, different patterns emerge in the sculpture.

Lannert  / Lylej
Lannert’s and Lylej’s hollow bodies are created by round flat weaves of varying widths. While Lannert’s coloured yarns are arranged to appear lighter toward the bottom, Lylej’s striped yarns are woven so that a variety of shapes emerges.

Dienke_Dekker - TOMET detail - picture by Henri VerhoefDienke_Dekker - LEGAN 3 - picture by Henri VerhoefDienke_Dekker - Dienke_Dekker - TANMA - picture by Henri VerhoefDienke_Dekker - PATSULA detail - picture by Henri VerhoefDienke_Dekker - LEGAN 2 - picture by Henri Verhoef

Pictures by Henri Verhoef
www.henriverhoef.com

Project is made in collaboration with DUTCH INVERTUALS

INTERSECT 2015

by Dienke Dekker

Stripes are one of the oldest and most basic forms of decoration and expression, conveying colour and rhythm. By interweaving these fundamental graphic elements the stripe and the construction challange each other into 2 and 3 dimensional grids. This interaction becomes subject to the research featuring a graphic conversation of stripe-based patterns and sripe-woven-form.
Materials: paper , gouache, pen, acrylic marker


DUTCH INVERTUALS – Body language, Milan 2015
Dutch Invertuals, Dienke Dekker 1 Dutch Invertuals, Dienke Dekker 7 Dutch Invertuals, Dienke Dekker 6 Dutch Invertuals, Dienke Dekker 3
Dutch Invertuals, Dienke Dekker 12
Dutch Invertuals, Dienke Dekker 13
Dutch Invertuals, Dienke Dekker 4Dutch Invertuals, Dienke Dekker 5Dutch Invertuals, Dienke Dekker 9Dutch Invertuals, Dienke Dekker 8

gekleurd vel Dienke Dekker 3
hand drawn paper sheet 60 x 100 cm, later cutted in strips and used for weaving
Alle vellen papier Dienke Dekker
different hand painted and drawn paper sheets 60 x 100 cm

Strips paper - Dienke Dekker
paper strips

Photo’s by Floor Knapen , Dienke Dekker

TASSEL, BOND, FLUX AND TWIST

by Dienke Dekker and KINNASAND

A year of intensive yarn design and weaving led to four new rug designs: Tassel, Bond, Flux and Twist. They are part of the FACES collection 2015 of the German textile and carpet company: KINNASAND.

See also:
www.kinnasand.com

press images FACES Kinnasand Dienke Dekker

TASSEL 
Combines a modern textured look with a flat-weave construction. Charming TASSEL has a grid of bright
braided cotton ‘ropes’ that have a stone-washed touch and sit over a base of black-and-white blended
yarns. These ‘ropes’ flow over the edge of the carpet in weft direction forming tassels, ensuring a seamlessly
fluid transition between carpet and floor.
Material: 75 % WV New Zealand, 25 % CO
FACES_Tassel_8821_C0010_W30Tassel color ways

TASSEL by Dienke Dekker

FLUX 
Incorporates the best of two worlds. FLUX has a rich melange body consisting of different naturally
coloured wool yarns and hand-dyed, delicate fringes. These feature a striking colour gradation and are
dyed according to the tie-dye technique – an ancient process that captures the full beauty of the dye.
Material: 100 % WV New Zealand

FACES_Flux_8819_C0012_W30FLUX colorways

 

TWIST 
Offers a charismatic interplay of minimum and maximum effects. TWIST has a bold geometrical grid with a black-and-white melange edge. It is constructed in two layers with a thin and crispy, bright coloured yarn randomly twisted with a thick, felted wool yarn. This gives it a vibrant surface and a ‘new-material feel’.
Material: 75 % WV New Zealand, 25 % CO

FACES_Twist_8822_C0014_W30 Twist Color ways

BOND
Integrates different proportions of yarns to create new colour spectrums. Woven in tightly combed bunches using two differently coloured fine woollen yarns, BOND features a graphic colour gradation that plays across its surface. Thanks to its construction, it is particularly detailed and has great depth of colour.
Material: 100 % WV New Zealand

FACES_Bond_8818_C0014_W30 BOND color ways

BOND by Dienke Dekker

PROCESS

Dienke Dekker color researchphoto by Dienke Dekker 7  photo by Dienke Dekker 5 photo by Dienke Dekker 3photo by Dienke Dekker 1photo by KinnasandDienke Dekker Flux researchphoto by Dienke Dekker 4photo by Dienke Dekker 2Dienke Dekker Tassel researchPhoto by dienke dekker 6Dienke Dekker Twist researchDienke Dekker Bond research

carpet design by Dienke Dekker
project in collaboration with KINNASAND, art direction by Isa Glink

2014

INTERSECT

by Dienke Dekker

Stripes are one of the oldest and most basic forms of decoration and expression, conveying colour and rhythm. By interweaving these fundamental graphic elements the stripe and the construction challange each other into 2 and 3 dimensional grids. This interaction becomes subject to the research featuring a graphic conversation of stripe-based patterns and sripe-woven-form.

Materials: paper , gouache, pen, acrylic marker

Dienke Dekker_Dutch Invertuals_2014_001 Dienke Dekker_Dutch Invertuals_2014_011 Dienke Dekker_Dutch Invertuals_2014_06 Dienke Dekker_Dutch Invertuals_2014_07 Dienke Dekker_Dutch Invertuals_2014_04 Dienke Dekker_Dutch Invertuals_2014_05
Intersect, Dienke Dekker picture by Barbara Medo Intersect by Dienke DekkerIntersect by Dienke Dekker 2 Intersect by Dienke Dekker 3
Project by: Dienke Dekker
Photo’s by: RAW COLOR, Barbara Medo and Dienke Dekker
Dutch Invertuals, COHESION, Dutch Design Week Eindhoven 2014

Light & Shadow

Observation and reflection of shadows were the start of this investigation about colours, shapes and materials. I observed and painted the shadows of certain objects during an entire day and translated these paintings into 3D objects.

THE SYMBIOSIS OF STONEWARE & PORCELAIN

by Daniel Costa and Dienke Dekker
The training of a complementary way of working together brought us to a research into stoneware and porcelain, two materials that complement each other as well. By bringing these materials into physical and chemical relation we finally conduct a collection of stoneware-porcelain meetings.
These meetings and mergings, the prosperous symbiosis of the two materials should be the leading voice in our research.
Deformation, shrinking, translucency, complementary beauty and the stack-ability of our research objects form the outline of the investigation: As porcelain deforms easier than stoneware an organic softness can be achieved. The combination of stoneware and porcelain allows subtle plays with light. Tactile qualities of stoneware complement the smoothness of pure porcelain.
We like to see the materials in shapes to observe their qualities in volumes, to behold the interaction with light and the relation to the 3-dimensional space.
Therefore we worked out a mould system that can be stacked in different ways allowing us to create assembled shapes in which we can freely play and organize the different layers of stoneware and porcelain. Layers that are independent from the shape. Every casted object has a plug on the top and bottom, allowing us to combine them in the raw state and fire them together into one object, or to fire them separately enabling us to combine them after the firing to observe amounts and proportions, making the system also applicable to bigger scales.

Dienke Dekker & Daniel Costa - the Symbiosis of Stonware & Porcelain
book ‘the symbiosis of Stoneware and Porcelain’

Dienke Dekker & Daniel Costa - the Symbiosis of Stonware & Porcelainstacking 8-9
Dienke Dekker & Daniel Costa - the Symbiosis of Stonware & Porcelain 2.2
Dienke Dekker & Daniel Costa - the Symbiosis of Stonware & Porcelainstacking 21
Dienke Dekker & Daniel Costa - the Symbiosis of Stonware & Porcelain stacking 50
Dienke Dekker & Daniel Costa - the Symbiosis of Stonware & Porcelain stacking 39

‘EKWC residency’
From the 8.10.2012 till the 4.11.2012 we stayed as designers in residence in the European Ceramic Work Center in den Bosch. The isolated environment, our individual atelier, well equipped workspaces and the technical support enabled complete dedication and concentration to the research. A place where nearly everything is possible and only time is an obstacle.Dienke Dekker & Daniel Costa - the Symbiosis of Stonware & Porcelain atelier EKWCDienke Dekker & Daniel Costa - the Symbiosis of Stonware & Porcelain moldsDienke Dekker & Daniel Costa - the Symbiosis of Stonware & Porcelain proces kilnDienke Dekker & Daniel Costa - the Symbiosis of Stonware & Porcelain Kiln
2012

 

 

 

UNION OF STRIPED YARNS

by Dienke Dekker
a project on the performance of striped yarns in woven textiles’
‘the Union of the Striped Yarns’ is a project revolving around the meeting points of striped yarns in woven textiles and the patterns emerging in which these stripes meet and find each other. By influencing the basic element of a textile, its yarn, the individual characters of the products are defined. The collaboration of the yarns and the different ways of interweaving them results in complex repetitions and sequences, seemingly random overall effects and intriguing color-plays. The achieved patterns are not always directly comprehensible, but the loose ends of the textiles unveil some of the mystery.
A carpet, a couch plaid and a chair cover show the different ways how the coloring of a yarn and the way it is woven can create new unions, ranging from industrial weaves realized in tied up and hand-dyed yarns to hand-weaves with industrially printed yarns as barrier tape to simple weaves in which the yarns were striped by the twining of two colored ropes.
Three different techniques of creating striped yarns are directed to the creation of this outspoken textile products.
materials: cotton, wool, plastic

Union of Striped Yarns - Dienke Dekker - Photography DAE

‘handdyed yarns, industrially woven’
By tying up yarns and then dying them, the tied up parts remain unpainted because the paint cannot reach these areas, creating striped yarns. With the ancient technique of Ikat, the yarns are tie-dyed in a very precise way to obtain a certain pattern when weaving with these yarns. This method of weaving is done by hand to be able to work with the exact right precision in order to achieve the wanted patterns. This is a painstakingly time consuming process. Hand-dyed yarns are special in every way in which they are used. Even an industrial weaving machine will bring its own rhythm when combined with these yarns and will result in more unplanned patterns.
Union of Striped Yarns - Handdyed Yarns - Dienke Dekker A
Union of Striped Yarns - Handdyed Yarns - Dienke Dekker B
Union of Striped Yarns - Handdyed Yarns - Dienke Dekker C
Union of Striped Yarns - Handdyed Yarns - Dienke Dekker E
Union of Striped Yarns - Handdyed Yarns - Dienke Dekker G

‘industrially printed yarn, handwoven’
A less time consuming and easier way instead of hand dyed yarns: the industrially printed yarns. This process began with the already existing red-white and yellow-black barrier tape and was continued with weaving with printed barrier tape in custom colors. By weaving barrier tape with the hands, patterns and different kinds of colors arise depending on the used color of the warp and the weft.Union of Striped Yarns - Industrially printed yarns - Dienke Dekker  C
Union of Striped Yarns - Industrially printed yarns - Dienke Dekker  D
Union of Striped Yarns - Industrially printed yarns - Dienke Dekker  B
Union of Striped Yarns - Industrially printed yarns - Dienke Dekker  A
Union of Striped Yarns - Industrially printed yarns - Dienke Dekker  E
Union of Striped Yarns - Industrially printed yarns - Dienke Dekker  F
Union of Striped Yarns - Industrially printed yarns - Dienke Dekker  G
Union of Striped Yarns - Industrially printed yarns - Dienke Dekker  J
Union of Striped Yarns - Industrially printed yarns - Dienke Dekker  K
Union of Striped Yarns - Dienke Dekker - carpet

‘turned yarns’
This method for creating striped yarns evolves from the traditional technique of turning yarns. By intertwining two or more yarns, thicker and stronger yarns are obtained. The possibility to intertwine yarns with contrasting colors results in striped yarns.Union of Striped Yarns - Turned Yarns - Dienke Dekker A
Union of Striped Yarns - Turned Yarns - Dienke Dekker F
2012

 

 

BASKET WEAVING

by Dienke Dekker
The basket weaving craft as the inspiration for a project about imitation and reinterpretation of crafts. From imitation of bamboo structure, the step was made to silkscreen printing on silk and other textiles with custom paint stamps, resulting in a series of archetypical objects.
materials: textile, wood, paper, metal, plastic, paint

Dienke Dekker Basketweaving - fabrics

Dienke Dekker Basketweaving -1
Dienke Dekker Basketweaving -1.1
Dienke Dekker Basketweaving -2
Dienke Dekker Basketweaving -2.1
Dienke Dekker Basketweaving -3
Dienke Dekker Basketweaving -3.1
Dienke Dekker Basketweaving -4
Dienke Dekker Basketweaving -4.1
Dienke Dekker Basketweaving -5
Dienke Dekker Basketweaving -5.1
Dienke Dekker Basketweaving - stamps 1
Dienke Dekker Basketweaving - bamboo samples 2
2011